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POUR LE SUJET: L'homme est-il réellement libre ?
TAPEZ LES MOTS-CLES: homme libre

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TAPEZ LES MOTS-CLES: homme nature ou homme nature société
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Cyrene

Greek Thessalian Nymph, carried off by the god Apollo to the country that came to be called Cyrenaica. There she bore Apollo a son, Aristaeus....

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Cycnus

Greek Son of Ares by Pelopia or by Pyrene. Cycnus was cruel and aggressive like his father, the god of war. Cycnus attacked and killed travelers in the region of Tempe, in Thessaly. He used their bones to build a temple for his father. One day he challenged Heracles. In the fearsome battle that followed, Heracles killed Cycnus and severely wounded Ares, who had...

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Cyclopes

Cyclopes (1) (Singular: Cyclops; Round-eyed) Greek Three sons of Uranus and Gaia, large and strong, each with one eye in the middle of his forehead; siblings of the Hecatoncheires, hundredhanded giants, and the younger Titans. Their names were Brontes (Thunder) Steropes (Lightning), and Arges (Thunderbolt); they were best known most for making lightning and thunder. Their father, Uranus, hated them, and banished them to Tartarus, the deepest...

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Cybele

Greek A Phrygian (Asiatic) goddess of fertility who found favor in Greece (in the fourth or fifth century b.c.) and Rome (in the third century b.c.). She was sometimes associated with Rhea, the ancient Titan, as she, too, personified the Earth in its primitive state. Cybele was sometimes known as Agdistis, who had some of the attributes of both a male and a female....

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Curetes

(Young Men) Greek The young Cretan warriors, possibly sons of Rhea, who guarded the infant Zeus when he was hidden on Mount Ida (2) in central Crete. The young men danced wildly and clashed their weapons together to drown out the sound of the infant's crying. Some sources suggest that there was a cult in Crete devoted to the god Zeus as a youth...

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Cupid

(Desire) Roman God of love, son of Venus and possibly of Vulcan, the fire god. Cupid is usually represented as a winged boy or fat baby, often blindfolded to denote his irresponsible nature, and carrying a bow and arrows, used to shoot his victims. Cupid is a Roman adaptation of the Greek god Eros. He was of no great importance except to writers...

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Cronus

(Kronus) Greek A Titan, the son of Uranus (Heaven) and Gaia (Earth). With his sisterwife, Rhea, Cronus fathered daughters: Demeter, Hestia, and Hera, and sons: Hades, Poseidon, and Zeus, who became Olympian gods. Cronus dethroned his father, Uranus, and was in turn dethroned by his son, Zeus. Cronus was probably a corn god in ancient times and is often depicted holding a sickle or scythe—the same...

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Crius

Crius (Krios) Greek A first-generation Titan; son of Uranus (Heaven) and Gaia (Earth); with Eurybia, a daughter of Pontus and Gaia, the father of Astraeus, Pallas, and Perses. Little is known of Crius other than his role as a father. However, hints in the writings of ancient Greeks suggest that he was a god of leadership and domestic animals and is associated with the ram,...

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Creusa

Creusa (1) (Glauca) Greek Daughter of King Creon of Corinth. Creusa married the hero, Jason. In jealous revenge, Medea, Jason's first wife, used her magic powers to kill Creusa. Medea sent Creusa a wedding dress soaked in poison. When Creusa put on the dress, it burned into her flesh and killed her. Creon, Creusa's father, also perished from the poison. Creusa (2) Roman Wife of...

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Crete

Greek An island southeast of Greece in the eastern Mediterranean. Crete had one of the world's earliest civilizations, and one of the most brilliant: the Minoan civilization, named after the legendary king Minos. It is believed to be the birthplace of classical Greek language and literature. In mythology, Minos was the son of the god Zeus and Europa. He married Pasiphaë, who fell in...

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Cratus

(Crato s; Krato s; Strength) Greek The personification of strength; a demigod or lesser god; son of the Titan Pallas and the water Nymph Styx; brother of Nike (Victory), Bia (Force), and Zelus (Zeal). Cratus and his siblings, winged creatures who moved very quickly, served as guards and attendants to Zeus. Their mother had sided with the great god in his battle with Cronus and...

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Cow

The cow, like the bull, was a common farm animal found in Greek mythology. It was an animal A corner of the Temple of Apollo in Corinth, Greece, probably built in the sixth century B.C., still stands on a hilltop. It is now a prominent tourist attraction. Cow 37 important to the worship of some gods and used in ceremonies or initiation rites. Zeus,...

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Corybantes

Greek The worshipers of Cybele who celebrated their goddess with wild dances and loud music. They were identified with the Galli and later with the Cretan Curetes....

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Coronis

Greek Daughter of Phlegyas, king of the Lapiths of Thessaly; mother of Asclepius, with the god Apollo. Apollo fell in love with Coronis when he saw her bathing in a lake. Coronis seemed to accept the love of Apollo. He left a white crow to watch over her, but Coronis then fell in love with Ischus. The crow sped off to tell the news...

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Cornucopia

(Horn of Plenty) Greek The horn of the goat-Nymph, Amalthea, who had tended the infant Zeus. The horn was as large and full as that of a cow's, and would remain forever filled with food and drink for its owners. Zeus gave the horn to the ash nymphs, Adrastia and Ida (1), who, along with Amalthea, had tended him when he was an infant....

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Corinth

Greek A city in the northeast Peloponnesus, strategically situated on the isthmus connecting Peloponnesus with central Greece. Corinth was one of the largest and most powerful cities of ancient Greece, a rival of Athens and traditionally allied with Sparta. Corinth traded with east and west and established numerous colonies....

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Consus

(The Storer) Roman An ancient but little-known Roman god of storage who protected the harvest once it was placed in silos, which were underground chambers in ancient Rome; an important god during the early agricultural days of Central Italy. The cult that worshiped Consus faded from importance as Rome became a major city and empire. Consus was also known as the consort of Ops,...

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Concordia

Roman The goddess who personified concord, or harmony, particularly between citizens and the state or government. The oldest temple to her was built in 367 b.c. at the foot of the Capitoline Hill, and represented an agreement between the commoners and the members of the ruling families. The Roman Senate often met in Concordia's temple. She is pictured on coins, which were usually minted...

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Comus

Roman A god of joy and mirth, of feasting and revelry. Comus was often represented as a young man with wings, who was rather sleepy, perhaps drunk, after a large meal. Romans associated him with Dionysus, the Greek god of fertility, wine, and pleasure. Comus loved wine, dance, and song....

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Coeus

Greek A first-generation Titan; son of Uranus and Gaia; father, with his sister Phoebe, of Asteria and Leto, who would become the mother of Apollo and Artemis (1). While best known in his role as a parent, Coeus was considered the god of intelligence and thinking. He was also the pillar of heaven around which the constellations evolved and, as such, the keeper of...

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Clytemnestra

Greek Daughter of Tyndareus, king of Sparta, and of Leda, sister of Helen and Castor and Pollux. Clytemnestra was the mother of Chrysothemis, Iphigenia, Electra, and Orestes. Clytemnestra married Agamemnon, king of Argos and Mycenae, of the accursed house of Pelops. When Agamemnon went to the Trojan War as commander of the Greek forces, Clytemnestra became the lover of Aegisthus, another descendant of Pelops. Clytemnestra hated...

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Clymene

Greek An Oceanid, or ocean nymph; one of the eldest daughters of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys, and, as such, considered a secondgeneration Titan; married Iapetus and with him was the mother of still more Titans: Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius. Clymene was also considered by some sources to be the mother of Phaeton and his weeping sisters, the Heliads, whose father was Helios, the...

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Cloelia

Roman A heroine of early Rome. Her story is told by many historians and poets, though some of the details vary. Cloelia was a Roman citizen taken hostage with a group of others by Lars Porsenna, the legendary leader of the people of Etruria who laid siege to Rome in 509 b.c. One day, Cloelia gathered a group of young women together and went...

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Cloacina Roman

A specialized goddess who presided over and protected the sewers of Rome. As Rome became the home to more people, they needed to move more and more significant amounts of waste out of the city. They invoked Cloacina and her power to help them build and maintain the great sewer system to clean the city. The greatest of these sewers was the Cloaca Maxima....

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Claudia Quintas

Roman A heroine of considerable fame. As the poet Ovid told her story, Claudia had a bad reputation among the citizens of Rome for wearing too much makeup and fancy hairdos. People spread rumors that she was not a virgin. She was a follower of Cybele, a Greek goddess of fertility. When the citizens of Rome decided to bring the cult of Cybele to...

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